Research Topics

Publications on International Monetary Fund (IMF)

There are 3 publications for International Monetary Fund (IMF).
  • The Tragedy of Greece


    Policy Note 2013/1 | March 2013
    A Case against Neoliberal Economics, the Domestic Political Elite, and the EU/IMF Duo
    The crisis in Greece reflects the deep structural problems of the country’s economy, its bureaucratic inefficiency, and a pervasive culture of corruption. But it also reflects the deadly failure of the neoliberal project, which has become institutionalized throughout the European Union’s operational framework—with the International Monetary Fund the world’s single most powerful enforcer of market fundamentalism.
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    Author(s):
    C. J. Polychroniou

  • Debtors’ Crisis or Creditors’ Crisis?


    Public Policy Brief No. 121, 2011 | November 2011
    Who Pays for the European Sovereign and Subprime Mortgage Losses?

    In the context of the eurozone’s sovereign debt crisis and the US subprime mortgage crisis, Senior Scholar Jan Kregel looks at the question of how we ought to distribute losses between borrowers and lenders in cases of debt resolution. Kregel tackles a prominent approach to this question that is grounded in an analysis of individual action and behavioral characteristics, an approach that tends toward the conclusion that the borrower should be responsible for making creditors whole. The presumption behind this style of analysis is that the borrower—the purportedly deceitful subprime mortgagee or supposedly profligate Greek—is the cause of the loss, and therefore should bear the entire burden.

  • Reserve Currencies and the Dollar’s Role in Containing Global Imbalances


    One-Pager No. 7 | November 2010

    The stability of the international reserve currency’s purchasing power is less a question of what serves as that currency and more a question of the international adjustment mechanism, as well as the compatibility of export-led development strategies with international payment balances. Export-led growth and free capital flows are the real causes of sustained international imbalances. The only way out of this predicament is to shift to domestic demand–led development strategies—and capital flows will have to be part of the solution.

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